Rediscovery More for Less

ebr July 2013Dr. Bruce Bloom, July 2013

Conducting medical research for drug rediscovery is a growing challenge, as the amount that is spent on it is minimal. However, there are many advantages with this method that are being overlooked See full article here

Cover Story by Ann Thayer  Volume 90 Issue 40, October 1, 2012

Drug Repurposing Finding new uses for approved drugs and shelved drug candidates is gaining steam as a pharmaceutical development strategy.

This fall, at least three conferences will bring together researchers to discuss how finding new uses for known drug compounds can be a strategy for both clinical development and business growth. A few years ago, no such conferences existed. The attendee lists show that interest is widespread among large pharmaceutical companies, small biotech firms, government agencies, academic groups, and nonprofit organizations alike.

by Lenore Skenazy

November, 2012  on Creators.com

Think of it as Goodwill versus Bloomingdale's — except with medicine.

Today most researchers trying to cure a disease are like designers. They start from scratch in a lab, trying to create something unique and miraculous (and, some hope, lucrative). The odds against them are terrible — for every 10,000 new drugs tested, one actually gets to patients — and the expense is enormous, too; $250 billion in research a year yields maybe 30 new drugs.

Isn't there an alternative?

There is. Call them thrift shop drugs — drugs that were created for some other people with some other disease but that just might work on another ailment, too.

Northbrook Star By Karie Angell Luc July 23, 2012 6:08AM

The longest day of golf has a hole-in-goal of shortening the distance to finding a cure for pediatric brain tumors.

Green Acres Country Club of Northbrook at 916 Dundee Road will host 24 players Monday who will take a swing at 1,400 combined holes of golf to raise $60,000 for pediatric tumor research via the Chicago philanthropicorganization Partnership for Cures.

“There is a personal connection,’ said Steve Goldsher of Northbrook, a print procurement consultant and also Partnership for Cures (volunteer) executive board member.  “Every year (18 year history), we choose a research project to fund with this year being for recurrent pediatric brain tumors.  This year’s research project was inspired by my relationship with the Wehrs and Pete (Weiss) and his family.”

Newsweek Magazine

May 14, 2010 

How the road from promising scientific breakthrough to real-world remedy has become all but a dead end.

By Sharon Begley and Mary Carmichael

From 1996 to 1999, the U.S. food and Drug Administration approved 157 new drugs. In the comparable period a decade later—that is, from 2006 to 2009—the agency approved 74. Not among them were any cures, or even meaningfully effective treatments, for Alzheimer's disease, lung or pancreatic cancer, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, or a host of other afflictions that destroy lives.

Newsweek June 15, 2009

by Sharon Begley

Now that President Obama has almost all of his top science picks in place—from the Department of Energy to the FDA—the lack of an appointee for director of the Nation-al Institutes of Health is standing out like a creationist at an evolution conference. I hope the delay means Obama has grasped the need for, and the difficulty of finding, a powerful director who can get beyond the rhetoric about moving discoveries out of the lab and make it a reality. That hasn't happened yet, six years after a much-ballyhooed NIH "road map" declared such bench-to-bedside research a priority and vowed to reward risk-taking, innovative studies, not the same old incremental research that has produced too few cures.  Read full article

Applied Clinical Trials Online

June 7, 2016

By Bruce Bloom

The case for supporting off-label use or commercialization in drugs for “unsolved” diseases.

There are over 7,000 “unsolved” diseases for which patients have no universally successful treatment. There are also thousands of generic drugs that can be repurposed to help these patients. Built on knowledge from scientific discoveries, anecdotal evidence, and/or bioinformatics, generic drug repurposing research can often lead to quick and affordable development of “new” medical solutions. Once a generic drug repurposing opportunity has been identified, a key issue is whether the clinical trial validation should focus on supporting a path to commercialization or to physician off-label use. The direction of focus depends on the entity supporting the clinical trial development.

 

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